Unleashing The Potential of Your Team

CALL TO ACTION

Twitter iconLinkedIn icon

Predicting talent flows…..

Posted by on 30 Jan 2012 in The Capable Leader | 0 comments

Accenture’s session at Davos on Growth, pointed to compelling data on the rapid growth in trade flows between Emerging Markets, as opposed to the often quoted trade flows data between developed economies and emerging economies.  This along with the proportion of people earning more than USD 50,000 per annum in places like Turkey and Indonesia, and the internal demand that fuels, global companies need not just focus on India and China as engines of growth. Talent flows tend to reflect trade flows and if Accenture’s projections for emerging market to emerging market trade flows holds true, talent will follow. In Asia for example MNCs and large Asian conglomerates are starting to provide ‘in-region’ developmental experiences between major Asian ‘hubs’ – South Asia, North Asia, and South East Asia – and ‘sub-hubs’ between those. With the progress Asia has made especially in the last 5 years, there is now a granularity and depth of market (not there previously) that provides interesting experiences for young emerging Asian leaders to learn and grow from and companies to better exploit.  The ‘head office posting’ is no longer the only game in town. TalentInvest consults for many global companies operating in...

Read More

Unconscious Bias training for leaders: All the rage! But does it really pay off?

Posted by on 29 Jan 2012 in The Capable Leader | 0 comments

Today, many companies invest heavily in unconscious bias training for leaders targeted at building awareness about bias. But unless the skill of ‘thinking about your thinking’ is applied to core organisational people processes, it is unlikely to make any material mindset shift in how inclusive leaders become of others’ ideas and contribution. For example unless the ideas around bias, its occurence and its dangers are applied to day to day people processes such as determining who is talent and who is not (talent management), or who is performing or who is not (performance management) or who is worth investing in and who is not (succession planning and development), it will remain at an awareness level. It is one thing to be aware of bias but quite another to become skilled at spotting it. We can all spot the biases of others but rarely our own! To ensure a payback for such training, companies have to go beyond just providing awareness training and shift their focus to skill building: for example building the skill associated with making intelligent choice and balanced judgements not only about people but also about the...

Read More

Sponsoring and promoting talent, without adding ‘program fatigue’

Posted by on 29 Jan 2012 in The Capable Leader | 0 comments

Written by Meena Thuraisingham, Director & Principal, TalentInvest, June 2011   Introduction A number of organisations went into over-drive following the publishing of Hermina Ibarra’s article in the HBR in October 2010 which asserted that women were over-mentored and under-sponsored, citing it as the reason why men are promoted more often than women. Even though the issues were well covered in her article, it was based on a relatively small sample of 40 people studied over 2 years in a single company.  This did not therefore allow for the criticality of organisational culture to be explored as a part of the sponsorship process. It also did not create a real understanding of how organisations could actually improve their mentoring efforts especially in relation to the capability of line leaders who champion such efforts. Having said this, in this article we are not suggesting more research or more data for something that has its roots and has produced tangible benefits from as far back as human history goes. We would not be enjoying the genius of Michelangelo today had it not been for his sponsor Lorenzo de’Medici.  We also don’t need to add yet another program in organisations that are already suffering from ‘program fatigue’. So let’s get to the questions most asked of us by our clients and perhaps put some perspective in the debate about sponsorship brought on not just by Hebbara’s article. Following on from many major reviews (the Lord Davis review in the UK into under-representation of women on FTSE boards, being only one of many) and as well as new SEC, FTSE and ASX rules around disclosure of director nominations, organisations that have not made much progress with minority representation at senior levels will be starting to worry. Is mentoring dead and sponsorship the new best thing? There is a definite place for mentoring and in our view an even bigger role for good mentoring. If you consider that mentoring is a proxy for experience (providing talent with access to experiences  that they could not ordinarily gain as quickly themselves), then the wisdom, insight and understanding that comes from a mentoring relationship cannot be replaced. The most successful leaders have mentors (several), some of whom advocate actively for them i.e. have been converted into sponsors. However organisations already suffering from ‘program fatigue’ have rushed to create sponsorship programs alongside mentoring programs that are not working. The imperative for organisations is to create a culture of personal sponsorship that is not divorced from their mentoring initiatives, but instead is very much part of their mentoring efforts and find ways to provide their mentors with the skills to operate like advocates and sponsors of their protégés. Should sponsors...

Read More

The future of Localisation Plans in a globalised talent market: a policy oxymoron or a paradox that needs an integrated response?

Posted by on 29 Jan 2012 in The Capable Leader | 0 comments

Written by Meena Thuraisingham, Director & Principal, TalentInvest, Jan 2012  There are too few Asian leaders in MNCs. Is this a simple issue of supply and demand or are there some complexities that underpin this issue and prevent us from finding solutions? In fact many organisations operating in Asia have had localisation plans in place for some years now and yet these plans have not produced a strong pipeline of Asian leaders.  Why is this so? This short essay challenges the approach taken to date with localisation strategies and reframes the issue in a way that gets us on the path to generating sustainable solutions to best resource our Asian businesses in a globalised world. The challenge Close to 30% of professionals below the age of 30 now work in a country other than their country of birth. These career mobile Gen Ys are not on expatriate packages, going simply where the best job opportunities are, even when these opportunities are cross-border – in fact increasingly because the opportunities are cross border. This level of globalisation of talent pools suggests that the notion of an Asian talent pool vs. non Asian talent may in fact be outdated and merely reflect the binary thinking trap we fall into when thinking about such challenges. Driven by commercial purpose organisations will gravitate to talent and talent pools that generate the best performance outcomes and return, wherever they may be located. But globalisation of the talent market has an unintended consequence – in that those not willing to work globally, (including promising Asian talent who do not wish to leave their home countries) will effectively be severely limiting their career options in a globalised world. The localisation plans of MNCs must therefore be grounded in this new reality for real progress to occur. Rather than focusing on localisation plans we should be focused on strategies that will best help us build a generation of diverse and globally skilled leaders to run our Asian businesses. The strategies for change There are 3 challenges that MNCs will have to address in their search for a more integrated solution for a healthier pipeline of Asian leaders: The all too narrow home country driven definition of what successful leadership looks like is clearly not ‘fit for purpose’ for a changed globalised world, and will continue to result in the appointment of  home country look alikes Local talent in countries that are emerging with growing economic confidence are not learning rapidly enough to operate more skilfully in global settings, including getting more comfortable taking assignments outside their local markets to prove their adaptiveness Leaders running  MNCs in Asia are not engaging and building a new generation of diverse...

Read More

The propensity for discernment and distinction & what drives balanced judgement & wise decisions

Posted by on 29 Jan 2012 in The Capable Leader | 0 comments

Written by Meena Thuraisingham, Director and Principal TalentInvest, Nov 2010   Wisdom about people or situations is not a product of knowledge and experience per se but of how that knowledge and experience is put to use in making a decision.  In some circumstances too much knowledge and experience may even be a liability – one of the reasons why you may have witnessed the most knowledgeable and experienced people making dumb decisions about people or situations. Judgement is balance – the ability to balance the more deductive elements of a given scenario e.g. logic, facts, data of a given situation and the more intuitive elements e.g. emotions, attitudes, feelings such as empathy, pride, fear, courage and so on A wise judgment is one where a good balance is struck between these 2 dimensions and this is only possible through choice that comes from reflection eg balancing with facts presented with the more intuitive elements. That is to say the very essence of wisdom is observed in one’s ability to make an explicit choice about balancing these 2 factors: Balance of interests = intrapersonal (one’s own conflicted interests), inter-personal (one’s interests relative to the interests of others), and extra-personal (the competing interests of others) Balance of responses = adapting, shaping and selecting from a range of possible responses often underpinned by one’s set of values.   To illustrate this point about balance consider these scenarios.   An executive driven by personal loyalty (the emotional dimension) but confronted with a loyal but under-performing team member may still apply objective and balanced assessment of the performance consequences on the business and all its stakeholders and recognise that, despite being loyal, this under-performing team member has to go.  Similarly an executive who recognises the pain that a major but necessary restructuring will have on her people may make a balanced choice to press ahead, but will handle the change process sensitively.  An executive who chooses to only engage with the business logic/case for change is unlikely to tune into the fears and anxieties of the people most affected by the change. By inference, poor or unwise judgment occurs when  balance is not applied. In our research this lack of balance manifested itself in who the derailed executive chose to rely on or trust or take counsel from. Instead they allowed themselves to be hijacked by one set of interests (sometimes the loudest or most insistent voice) or ignored the existence of others whose interests did not align with their own. The consequence of not recognising the interests of all stakeholders was often that the person’s judgements about the appropriate responses to a given situation became clouded. This caused them to be seen by others as partial or...

Read More
asd
Top